Thursday, November 29, 2012

Now We Wait Until Spring

My job is the exterior landscaping of the new greenhouse. I can drop hints for what would be nice for the interior. I'm picturing a nice potted lemon tree on wheels.

The exterior is now prepped and ready to go the moment the nurseries reopen in the spring.




















Such a posh greenhouse needs a posh landscape. I have been leaning towards strong hints of a formal Italianate design. The lady of the house has requested roses. The head gardener hates roses. So there will be roses planted within a strong formal design that will provide winter interest.

It will be the head gardener's job to steer the lady of the house to some reliably hardy to zone 6 shrub roses that are totally low maintenance and disease and pest free, preferably an old fashioned rose in a unique color. We can't be having off the rack roses. I know a few rose geeks who may have some good suggestions.




















We already have a nice statue for a more formal landscape. I tried searching for who exactly this cupid with a wreath and greyhound is but had no luck.


























At this time of year the goats will also have to wait until spring for any fresh greens. They have pretty much eaten up their acre and a half allotment. The corn stalk bundles from the harvest season decorations were a big hit though. The goats like me. They know I will toss things over the fence and come calling when I get close.




















I'm ready for winter though. I can use the rest.

14 comments:

Pam said...

Beautiful greenhouse - dreamy place to work!

Marie Pavie (a polyantha) might be sweet. Repeat blooms like crazy, I have no problems with it along the SC coast (haven't checked its zone tolerance yet).

Jean said...

Christopher, you might want to check out Antique Rose Emporium for some hardy shrub roses. Their roses always arrive in great shape for me. Zone info is on their website. Btw, Marie Pavie always gets blackspot for me. But its fragrance is wonderful.

Christopher C. NC said...

Thanks Pam the good suggestion. Exactly what the head gardener ordered.

Jean my google on Marie Pavie took me to the Antique Rose Emporium first and to Phillip Oliver second. We get enough rain that blackspot could be an issue for the lady of the house. The head gardener ignores such things.

Pam said...

Fortunately it's been less affected by black spot for me - just seems to plug along with few worries... but you get more rain than we do I think (or you have been for a few years). Another pretty one is Blossomtime - it is relatively free of blackspot for me too (they call it a climber, but mine a weak climber, at best). Beautiful flowers, mildly fragrant.

http://www.antiqueroseemporium.com/roses/1026/blossomtime

Lynn Hunt said...

What a lovely place! If you need rose advice we are here to heelp!

Lynn Hunt said...

Oops, I meant help!

Lola said...

Beautiful. You will do fine with the planting.

Christopher C. NC said...

Lynn I am taking names of any easy care shrub roses that fit the description. The place is at about 3000 feet on the other side of the mountains from you.

Christopher C. NC said...

Lola my formal Italianate design is coalescing in my head.

Gail said...

Beautiful setting Christopher. I know nothing about roses except that I've been trying to locate a few of the hard to find natives.

Lisa at Greenbow said...

Maybe you could borrow a couple of goats to help you clean up some of your wild meadow.

Hartwood Roses said...

Since you're in NC, contact Paul Zimmerman. He used to own Ashdown Roses, and now he's hooked up with Biltmore (among others) and is a great promoter of 'garden' roses. He is familiar with your climate details and will certainly suggest great roses for your design.

Siria said...

Gorgeous green house and I know you will have fun with this design! I laughed at Lisa's post because I was thinking the same thing! You need to get you a goat! :))

Christopher C. NC said...

If goats could be trained to only eat certain things I'd be all for having a goat. But they eat everything down to the nub then start chewing the bark off the trees.