Thursday, April 13, 2017

In The Time Of The Mayapples

The arrival of the Mayapples is a big sign that spring is here.





















A very big sign. As in get out of the way, the Mayapples are coming.





















Magnolia 'Jane' is getting ready to bloom. 'Jane' is smart. She waits a bit before trying to bloom and is less likely to get zapped by late freezes.





















One of my fancy store bought trilliums was the biggest it has ever been and had the showiest flower ever. It also got unusually tall. Then the stem snapped and it fell over. It was not completely severed at least. Some connection to the bulb is better than none. It will have to finish the year as is.






















The daffodils are coming to an end as the native wild flowers begin.





















The Celandine Poppy, Stylophorum diphyllum, are having a good bloom. I don't seem to get as much self sowing as happens next door. I think my leaf litter is thicker and the turkeys regularly scratch the peck out of the hillside where Bulbarella's are. A slow expansion is this case is probably for the good. They can be aggressive.





















Cousins Itt. The Shredded Umbrella Leaf, Syneilesis aconitifolia, are very similar to the Mayapples in form and behavior. Oddly, they are a member of the aster family.





















The store bought Trillium luteum are smart and stay short. Even better they have grown and multiplied better than all the other store bought trilliums. They are just low on the luteum.





















Dicentra cucullaria, Dutchman's Breeches, is one of the wandering weeds in the wild cultivated gardens.





















I let it be. It appears, blooms and just as quickly seems to vanish. That is a good kind weed to have.





















I found my Uvularia. Accidentally. This is why it is important to ever so slowly stroll the garden once or twice a day. I basically forgot I planted it there. Best of all, three out of three Uvularia I relocated have returned. My first attempt was eaten.



























I love my Great Lawn. I planted more weed bulbs in it this week.





















The stump of the lightning struck birch the utility company took down has been bleeding profusely. That in itself is not unusual.



























This is unusual. It started out clear. Now it looks like a Dreamcicle.





















The garden is creeping into green.





















As the life stored in the earth begins to wake.





















It is the Time of the Mayapples.


1 comment:

Lisa Greenbow said...

I just love mayapples. They look so cheerful. I have a small patch. It has stayed small. Probably because I use wood mulch. Fun to have them popping up so cheerfully. The same with my dutchmans breeches. I have one plant. Have had it for years. It pops up, blooms and goes away. Never has reproduced. Hmmmmm...I don't have enough leaves to much with them. No turkeys to come through and scratch around.