Wednesday, April 26, 2017

The Trouble With Trilliums

One





















Two





















Three





















Four and Five





















Six or a larger version of five.





















So six or seven. Two, maybe three are not shown so that makes eight or nine, maybe ten kind trilliums. Does that make sense. I sure get confused.

There are big petaled and skinny petaled pure white ones. The white ones can age to a deep pink. There is one oddball that does tie dye. The cream white ones can open with a pink blush and even have freckles. There is a smaller sideways blooming red one and a big black red one that hides under the leaf. Got it? How many species of trilliums do I have?

The luteum is beginning to show now in Trillium luteum.





















The fern fronds are still unfurling. There are unfurling fern fronds all over the place. I have four or five species of ferns I can think of off the top of my head. There could be more. There is. I just thought of another one.





















There is more than one kind Uvularia, but I just have three patches of the one species. So far.





















Lots of trilliums.





















The False Solomon's Seal is coming up.





















Puff





















Pink Puff Darmera peltata.





















Have I mentioned the Bluebells?





















My trilliums probably don't stick with their own kind. The subtle variation is a taxonomic headache. The solution of course is not to worry about it. All the gardener needs is for my trilliums to look like this.





















Deep in the forest they are busy doing what they do. All the kinds of them all mixed up.





















I'll have to look this up later, but I think it is called Twisted Mandarin and there is more than one kind, a large, much showier flowered version and the small one. I have found the small one in several locations. I need to find the big flowered kind. Then I need to move some into the garden.




















I could also start work on clearing a trail and tidying the forest to make visiting the wild things easier. It's on the list.




















Bluebells with Moby Rock and white blooming Sedum ternatum on top.





















That's life in the wild cultivated gardens.


2 comments:

Lisa Greenbow said...

It is exciting to see that many kinds of trilliums all abloom. Makes me want more.

Lea said...

Beautiful!
Have you linked this up with Wildflower Wednesday at Clay and Limestone? Gail would be delighted to have you join in
Have a great day!