Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Microscopic Daffodils

This garden is still full of surprises for me. Plants get divided and moved around. Plants move themselves. Plants set their own seed and seeds get collected and scattered or sown. Plants live, die and multiply. Some years they appear and some they don't or we fail to notice them amidst the botanical chaos. This would be chaos of the good kind at least. The dead stick chaos is now more subdued and just perhaps more is being revealed.



Teeny tiny miniature daffodils are showing up. This Lilliputian daffodil would be hard to spot in a dedicated rock garden of miniatures. In the wild cultivated garden it is a wonder I stumbled upon it and several other clumps of microscopic daffodils. They must be late bloomers. Only now are flower buds showing.



They were all near this new anemone I found.



And another Fritillaria meleagris was discovered. I think this one may be white.



I have been on peony patrol everyday. Last year caterpillars put a major hurting on the new growth before we noticed and started squishing them. This year it is not going to happen. The caterpillars are being squished before they wreck the peonies.

Then I discovered a new peony. I do not remember one being here. I marked it with a stick because I walk through this non-path area on occasion and would not want to step on it. That could be worse than caterpillar damage.



Of course there are daffodils. Here is one of those fancy urban double ones. Here I suppose you could call it Country Chic.



Some daffodils are just now in their prime. This one might be 'Petrel'.



There are other daffodils that have not yet opened. A big fat non-blooming clump that was marked for division is loaded with buds this year. Wonder what it will be.

6 comments:

chuck b. said...

Meanwhile I'm totally cutting back daffodil foliage right now. Sick of it!

I'm just glad it's not snowing anymore. (right?)

fairegarden said...

Oh the sweetness of the tiny daffs, Christopher! So glad you noticed it. Love the anemone, we have some seed grown ones similar called Madonna that are holding their own against the vinca major under the tall pines, a worthy plant for sure. How wonderful that the daffs have the early, mid and late season to extend their show.
Frances

Randy Emmitt said...

Christopher,
We are still waiting for our last daff to bloom, Tiny Bubbles. If you want awesome miniatures I recommend Baby Moon and Hawera. Hawera some new bulbs had 7 bloom stalks!! Once Tiny Bubbles blooms I'll post these daffodils on my blog.

Anonymous said...

Sounds like you're on an Easter egg hunt out there, finding new plants every day! That would be fun. Enjoying the photos; what a glorious spring after the hot weather debacle.

bev

Christopher C. NC said...

Chuck in the back 40 feet I imagine every lick of foliage matters. I don't have that problem in the wild cultivated garden. It better not snow again or we are going to be royally screwed. Now we are two weeks ahead of schedule and everything is leafing out.

Frances this year the daffs were kind of packed in tight bloom time wise. Made for a really good show. The anemones here are of several colors and varieties. Even the leaves look slightly different from one to another.

Randy I'll stop by and have a look at your miniatures. In this place I think it is hard to show them to best advantage, but Bulbarella just can't say no to a different kind of daffodil.

Bev it is always like an Easter Egg Hunt/Treasure hunt around here. Found a new fritillaria today and an unknown wildflower that had reseeded quite well in the roadside vegetable garden area. Once it blooms I'll see if I can figure out what it is. Has very dianthus like foliage in a rosette and a bit bigger leaf. I remember one from last year. Forgot to answer about the daffodil foliage. It is never cut and is allowed to just die back natural and disappear. It gets swallowed up by all the other perennials and wildflowers and isn't really all that noticeable despite there being 10,000 of them.

Anonymous said...

"Unknown wildflower that reseeded quite well" hmmm. Sounds ominous to me.....

bev